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Issues In The News

Nigeria Records Improvement, Ranked 39th on Corruption Index

Nigeria Records Improvement, Ranked 39th on Corruption Index

04 Dec 2014

Nigeria recorded significant improvement in the Transparency International’s ‘Corruption Perception Index 2014’ as the country was ranked 136th out of 175 countries/territories surveyed.

Nigeria was ranked 144 in the index in 2013. The 2014 performance showed that the country improved by nine places.

However, the report released by the Germany-based non-governmental organisation on Wednesday showed that the country is the 39th most corrupt nation among the 175 countries on the index.

The country was scored 27 out of 100, higher than the 25 it was in 2013.
The Corruption Perception Index ranks countries and territories based on how corrupt their public sector is perceived to be. A country or territory’s score indicates the perceived level of public sector corruption on a scale of 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean).

A country or territory’s rank indicates its position relative to the other countries and territories in the index.

According to the report, poorly equipped schools, counterfeit medicine and elections decided by money are some of the consequences of public sector corruption.

“Bribes and backroom deals don’t just steal resources from the most vulnerable – they undermine justice and economic development, and destroy public trust in government and leaders.

“Based on expert opinion from around the world, the Corruption Perceptions Index measures the perceived levels of public sector corruption worldwide, and it paints an alarming picture.

Not one single country gets a perfect score and more than two-thirds score below 50, on a scale from 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean).

“Countries at the bottom need to adopt radical anti-corruption measures in favour of their people. Countries at the top of the index should make sure they don’t export corrupt practices to underdeveloped countries,” the Chairman of Transparency International, José Ugaz, said.

He also pointed out that corruption is a problem for all countries, adding that a poor score was likely a sign of widespread bribery, lack of punishment for corruption and public institutions that don’t respond to citizens’ needs.

Meanwhile, Nigeria shared same position in the index with Cameroun, Iran, Lebanon, Kyrgyzstan and Russia.

Denmark was adjudged the least corrupt country as it emerged top out of the 175 countries. The country was closely followed by New Zealand, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, Singapore, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Canada, Australia, Germany, Iceland and United Kingdom, in that order.

On the other hand, North Korea and Somalia were rated as the most corrupt countries in the world. Other countries also on the bottom of the corruption index are Sudan, Afghanistan, South Sudan , Iraq, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Libya, Eritrea and Yemen.

http://www.thisdaylive.com/articles/nigeria-records-improvement-ranked-39th-on-corruption-index/195767/

About TransformationWatch

TransformationWatch is an online news site founded by Henry Omoregie It is focused on keeping tabs on the Transformation Agenda set out by the Nigerian leadership in the Local, State and Federal Governments. My mission is to observe, analyze and report milestones or slowdowns in promised service delivery in all the facets of governance in Nigeria (2011 and beyond). Readership is open to all Nigerians and friends of Nigeria alike, regardless of Tribe, Religion or Political divide. We are all in this together

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